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Old Newport single shot .410

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paul1168063
Joined: April 2016
Posts: 0
Posted: April 23, 2016 04:11 PM
Hi Guys, Recieved an old gun from a friend, its a single shot .410 with NEWPORT stamped on the receiver, and up near the top in a circle with a 21 inside it. the barrel and receicer tangs have 489 U hand stamped on them. I'm looking for a new firing pin and firing pin spring.....if it's still safe to shoot that is. If not, I'll clean her up and hang it on the wall ;-) Thanks.  
Ezequiel
Joined: August 2011
Posts: 7475
Posted: April 24, 2016 11:27 AM

"NEWPORT" is the name stamped on a "Hardware" gun made for the hardware store chain of HIBBARD,SPENCER,BARTLETT and Co. of Chicagoe Illinois. They contracted with the H&D Folsom Arms Co of New York City to provide firarm for their chain of outlets. Folsom was also the marketing end of the Crescent Firearm Co of Norwich Ct...a very prolific provider of such firearms. There are over 200 KNOWN tradenames. All the compnay records were destroyed ca 1930 so no one know ...for sure..exactly how many names were used. The deal was..you could contract with them with a minimum order....could be as little as 5 units....pick a name and purchase the roll stamp and Crescent would make your brand of gun. The "kicker" here is this..Your gun could be out there with 200 different names on it and..basically...be the same gun..Knowing the names on that list can help you find parts.The Standard Catalog Of Firearms(printed by Gun Digest Books...has that list) Another thing you have to watch for is that..at times..orders overwhelmed the Crescent ability to produce. To deal with that, they would contract with similar companies in Belgium to produce barrels and barreled actions to fill thier orders. Harly any of the parts from these compnents were universal fits with the domestic product like, You can ID your gun by proofmarks. They(if there are any) on the uderside of the barrel assy at the chamber end.The proofs for Belgium are some form of "ELG"...but any proof mark basically says the part was made overseas as the USA does not have a national Proofhouse. The SC of FA says this about Crescent Singler barrels:

SINGLE-SHOT

Made in 12,16,20 and 28 gauges nd the .410 bore. Barrels lenghts of 26',28",30" and 32 inch with various chokes...It had an exposed hammermFLUID STEEL BARRELS, and a walnut pistol grip shoulder stock.

VALUES: Exc=$200....VG=$125...Good=$100...Fair=$75 and poor=$50

 The IMPORTANT thing here is the highlighted and that is the composition of the barrels...Fluid steel was the material used to deal with the higher pressures of smokeless(modern) powdered ammo as opposed to Damascus or twist steel. That is not to say,unconditionally, that your gun is safe to fire..The steels used back when these were made was quite a bit milder than todays gun steels..an almost a 100 years of life have done nothing to upgrade that.

Dates:

Crescent/Folsom  1892 to 1931 when it was purchased by Savage Firearms. Savage continued to market some Crescent product  assembled from acquired shelf stock. Late guns appear to be a combination of Savage and Crescent parts...basically jury-rigged together..Certain guns may also ustilize parts from the several other gun companies acquired by Savage is a similar manner. Point is..Any part you buy should be on a conditional basis witha return option.

 In Joseph T. Vorisek's three volume set of books titled "The Breechloading Shotgun.....1860-1940" in volume 1 there is quite a few pages on Crescent. There is also a list of tradenames used on Hardware guns. There are a pair of names listed

Newport Model CN

Newport Model WN

There is no note indicating importation by Folsom,but check for proofmarks anyway.

Take note that Folsom had about 2 dozen salesmen inSouth America ca 1890 to at least 1920 and many of the same guns listed were also stamped with Spainish or Portugese names. Known production of single bbls is approx 907,500 units not including the sidehammer models.

Vorisek lists some model numbers for the singles.I'll only list those that MAY apply to your gun

Model 7 Raised frame Victor 12,16.20 and 410 1897-1915

*Model 8: same as above except it has auto ejector

Model 9  No known data

Model 10 Flat frame version of the 7 1901-1932

Model 11 same as 10  w/auto ejector

*Model 13 New Field. Cheaper version of the 11  1910-1920

*Model 14..ditto of  13 w/ejector

Model 15..cheaper version of the 10/11 1928-1932

Any of the * models did not appear in the retail catalog and may have been used as in-house ID There is also a Model 15 called a "Handy Gun which is a pistol like gun that is an NFA item  a speciel BATFE license is requied to even possess this one

Raised frame has a sideplate like raised portion on the side of the frame..the FLAT frame does not have this

If I had to hazard a guess on your gun..i would start by looking at the FLAT FRAME Models made until 1932

As to firing.It should be checked by a gunsmith and even then I suggest you use the auto tire and LONG piece of string method...Take an unmounted auto tire..insert the buttstock between the beads and lay the forend over the opposite side...secure with a bungee cord.tie a long piece of string to the trigger and back off at least a 100 feet and get behind some sort of shelter..Load the fireaerm at a place in the procedure when it is EZ to do so. Take note that 410 comes in 2 length 2 1/2 inch and 3 inch..it shoud be stamped on the barrel..if it isn't clearly marked 3"  the use the short ammo.Also..take note that early 410 are based on the 44 caliber pistol/rifle cartridge loaded with birdshot...While these LOOK like 410's...they are not..check the chambering carefully...

The Books cited

www.cornellpubs.com

Ezequiel
Joined: August 2011
Posts: 7475
Posted: April 24, 2016 12:42 PM

Some further research has shown that the hardware chain also contracted with Harrington and Richardson to supply a similar product..Google of both the Crescent and H&R products should bring up pictures

There is also some evidence that the chambering can be in question..The Old Ely 12mm shotshell was the chosen cartridge on some early guns...then came to 2.5" version followed by the Winchester 3" version in 1933...that brings the question of DOM and brand into question..Crescent guns will be(IMHO) either  the 44 cal..the Ely 12mm or the 2.5" shell...it is very important to determine which

I found this data by a Google search of "Obsolete Firing Pins" and scanning the various forums this brings access to....

candyelily
Joined: August 2022
Posts: 2
Posted: October 25, 2022 08:30 PM (This post was last edited October 25, 2022 08:31 PM)

410 with NEWPORT is beautiful and special gun. I like it, you're s lucky basketball stars